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Blue Wisteria/Wisteria frutescens is a vine that is incredibly beautiful when in full bloom. There is a variety of Blue Wisteria; the Chinese and Japanese ones are invasive so if one is planting a new wisteria for the first time, go with the American wisteria as it is not an aggressive grower. Blooms in spring with large clusters of drooping flowers in the color bluish purple or lilac. The flowers are wonderfully fragrant.

Blue Wisteria

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$4.49
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Description:
Wisteria - Wisteria sinensis Hardy Planting Zones- 5-9 Sun or Shade – Full Sun Mature Height - 360+" Mature Width- 48" - 96" Bloom Season – Spring (April to June) Gardener Status- Beginner
Status: In Stock

Blue Wisteria-Wisteria frutescens

 

Blue Wisteria/Wisteria frutescens is a vine that is incredibly beautiful when in full bloom. There is a variety of Blue Wisteria; the Chinese and Japanese ones are invasive so if one is planting a new wisteria for the first time, go with the American wisteria as it is not an aggressive grower. Blooms in spring with large clusters of drooping flowers in color bluish purple or lilac. The flowers are wonderfully fragrant.Vines do well in well-drained soil that is moist and fertile and needs to be planted in full sun. If the soil is not ideal, use compost and plant Blue Wisteria in the spring or the fall. To plant, dig a hole as deep as the plant’s root ball, and 2 to 3 times as wide. If planting more than one vine, space plants 10 to 15 feet apart. Since wisteria vine thrives, it is best to make sure that you plant the vine away from other plants, as it could take over it.
To get the best flowering, pruning is key. For new wisteria plants, prune the vine back aggressively, and next year cut the main stem or stems back to three feet of the previous season’s growth. Once the framework of the vine is fully grown, shorten further growth in midsummer to where the growth is for the current season. When the vine is, further along, prune late in the winter, removing at least half of the year’s prior growth, and once plants are full grown severe pruning is not needed.